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Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Brain tumor

Tuesday, March 18, 2008
Brain tumor
A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor formed by abnormal and uninhibited cell division, in general either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or multiply from cancers chiefly located in other organs (metastatic tumors). Primary brain growths are universally located in the posterior cranial fossa in offspring and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can involve any part of the brain. In the United States in the year 2005, it was estimated that there were 43,800 new cases of brain tumors (Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States, Primary Brain Tumors in the United States, Statistical Report, 2005 - 2006), which accounted for 1.4 percent of all malignancies, 2.4 percent of all malignant cells deaths, and 20–25 percent of pediatric cancers. At the end of the day, it is anticipated that there are 13,000 deaths per year as a upshot of brain tumors.

1 comments:

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